Findborg Cooperation
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I’m plannimg on writing a digital story about airplane company AIR pauke.

So above is my first work in progress

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Original linkOriginal author: Kevin Pauly

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Brunch w/ Mom, Bitch.

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Original linkOriginal author: Beth Heinly

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Life of Superheroes without Superpowers

The word superhero in the 21st century is more than just a word. It’s a feeling, an emotion for most of the millennial around the world. Though they were brought to life in the 20th century, they are more alive in this era than ever before. What seems to be just some kind of weird, abnormal imagination or was just merely fun, today has emerged globally in ways that nobody ever thought.

I am a huge superhero fan. I believe in some of the values that get shared to us via the story. I am a DC comics fan. Not that hardcore that I will know everyone about them, but I know a few and know them well. Every character has its unique story, something valuable to share.

But of all the superheroes, the one without powers rule the world with the most intensity. Because at last, they show us a hope that how much we are capable of doing the unimaginable things, that we don’t even give much thought to it. These superheroes are the best example of what human beings can achieve through intense training, practice, and consistency. It shows us how much we can achieve if we take a good count of action if we take certain efforts we can achieve these things as well.

It always feels better for a moment and after the certain point in life when the reality hits, we just give up on them and why not? It is merely just someone’s imagination. Even if we try to achieve or just take some actions it soon gets into the pretty negative outlook of ourselves. Thus, we stop right there and do the things that we need to or the things that are easy and even in more sense that aligned lot more with the reality that we perceive.

The interesting things we can all learn from these superheroes without powers it’s not their skills, not their achievement, not their crazy and almost lunatic skills but rather their willingness to do anything and everything, the way they focus on always changing and improving things around themselves. The way they do the things are not repetitive but challenging. Its what always makes us grow, its all that makes us human truly to achieve great things we are capable of.

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My History with Comics

Personally, I haven’t had a lot of experience with comic books. My best friend Alex is obsessed with them and has always tried to get me into them but between all the books I have purchased and haven’t read and school work I just never found the time. I have always thought that comics were a very interesting form of art and that they deserve a lot more credit than they are given. Creating a comic book takes time and a lot of skill in my opinion yet comics are one of the least appreciated forms of literature. I think that this class will show me just how much to appreciate comic books and different ways for me to try to include them in my future classroom.

Original linkOriginal author: Kali Hopkins

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Glass

Mi expectativas estaban por las nubes desde que vi Múltiple. Esa escena final, que la conectaba con El Protegido (supongo que a estas alturas esto no es un spoiler) me puso la piel de gallina. Además, Múltiple tenía grandes virtudes, como un sorprendente James McAvoy, una magnífica Anya Taylor-Joy y una punzante banda sonora. Sin embargo, tras haber visto Glass en VO, me queda la sensación de que podía haberme gustado mucho más, porque no llega a ser tan estimulante como las dos películas anteriores de esta trilogía.

Glass tiene virtudes. McAvoy sigue estando espectacular, y no solo me refiero a su impresionante despliegue físico para encarnar a “La Bestia”. Samuel L. Jackson también lo borda, pero Bruce Willis no logra emocionarme con su hierática actuación. El resto del reparto no desentona.

“La confianza en uno mismo es contagiosa”

-Elijah Price.

La película empieza genial, con una escena que te anticipa que el enfrentamiento entre los personajes de McAvoy y Willis va a llegar antes de lo esperado. Tras este prometedor inicio, la acción pasa a “un manicomio” para personas que se creen superhéroes, y el ritmo baja considerablemente. Esto no sería un problema si no fuera porque está claro lo que va a acabar pasando al final…

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Cucaracha Tales — Enjoy The Silence Part 2

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Original linkOriginal author: El Boxa

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Wedding

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Original linkOriginal author: El Boxa

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Is ok to just be?

Not sure if being like a plant is the ultimate state of minimal zen or a lifetime of complete dependence on invisible forces.

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Original linkOriginal author: agency andy

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Analyzing comics from a discursive approach — Defining basic analysis units

This entry (and all the upcoming ones related to it) is a revised translation of my undergrad thesis, which was originally written and published in Spanish, and can be found here.

In general terms, comics can be defined as a type of text constituted through the collaboration of two systems of meaning: graphic elements of some sorts (be it illustration, photographies, or any other), and discourse units (which work in a similar way to the different kind of utterances one can find in other texts). According to Scott McCloud (known for his works Understanding, Reinventing, and Making Comics) what makes comics differ from other types of texts is the way they are built by juxtaposing these two systems in order to create deliberate narrative sequences. In other words, comics are built as texts by making pictorial and discursive elements collaborate with each other, and not by having either system subordinate the other one.

The Dailies by Dakota McFazdean (2015). This comic employs both pictorial and linguistic elements in order to convey meaning. While it is also possible to come across comics that don’t use any kind of discursive element or pictorial elements — though the latter is far less common — these entries will focus on analyzing comics built through the integration of the aforementioned systems.

With this understanding of comics being construed through a collaboration of pictures and discourse, it is possible to ask oneself in what ways it is possible to analyze them as texts? There are two general answers to this question. The first one by analyzing comics through a focus on a comic’s contents (be it characters, themes, aesthetics, or any aspect related to the comic as a cultural product). The second answer involves focusing on the way these type of texts are organized in order to make sense as cohesive units. This entry will approach this second way, presenting some of my findings and ways to approach comics as texts that are configured following sets of conventions that are akin to those defined in grammatical models.

As with any other type of text, analyzing comics from a discursive point of view first requires an understanding of the different kinds of units these are made of, and of the way in which said units relate to each other in functional terms. With this idea in mind, a good first step is to get a detailed look of the recurring elements that constitute different comics.

If one were to look at several comics, one of the most striking features shared by most of them would be the fact that they’re segmented and organized in smaller units of meaning. Said units are recognizable by having some sort of visual separation between them and they are known as panels. Luis Gasca and Roman Gubern (1988) consider the comic panel to be, from a semantic (that is, from a meaning) point of view, both the basic narrative structure and the main lexical-pictographic unit in comics. According to these two authors, all the resources used to convey meaning in this kind of texts will be contained within panels.

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Bill Maher Continues Attacks On Comics and Stan Lee, Doesn’t Bother to Check His Facts

Bill Maher doubled-down on his criticism of Stan Lee and his life’s work as childish things meant to be discarded. It’s likely it was done to inspire another round of articles and responses, like this one. Most of the segment just saw him quoting his critics and calling them fat nerds who don’t get laid. Not found in this editorial, unlike the few that make decent arguments, is any kind of real argument. He thinks comics are for kids and fuck you if you think otherwise. He does make one attempt to cite some kind of evidence to support his claim, but it’s just factually incorrect. He also doesn’t realize that rather than kids’ stuff, comic books are the best thing on the market to compete with the thing he hates most: religion.

In the segment (video embedded below), Maher reads the response to his original comments from Stan Lee’s POW! Entertainment. In the polite missive, the writers point out that Maher did, in fact, insult Stan Lee. They also make the case that comic books are literature. Then they wrote:

“…[Y]ou have a right to your opinion that comics are childish and unsophisticated. Many said the same about Dickens, Steinbeck, Melville and even Shakespeare.”

Maher’s response to this was to mock them for being so hilariously wrong, which they would know if they “ever read a book without pictures.” Of course, Maher is the one who couldn’t be more wrong. Melville faced heavy criticism throughout his career. His contemporary critics called his work “hodgepodge,” “monstrous,” “bizarre,” “fanciful,” and all other era-appropriate terms for both “childish” and “unsophisticated.” Dickens also faced such criticisms. Some of his peers, like Thackeray, loved his work. Many others hated it. They suggested his themes were simplistic, his style was clunky, and that he was a sellout. Shakespeare also caught some of this heat from his fellows and even after. He wasn’t even really appreciated until about the 17th Century. (There’s also a fringe collection of academics who think Shakespeare didn’t write his plays.) He caught flak both from his contemporaries, like Robert Green, and from objectively great writers throughout the subsequent centuries.

What all three of those writers share, and Stan Lee as well, is that their work was loved and consumed by the “masses.” Maher, who famously called the majority of Americans “stupid” ten years ago, doesn’t even bother to do any criticial thinking here. If a lot of people love comic books and movies based on them, then it must be for dumb-dumbs and toddlers. He clumsily makes this connection by showing a few social media posts tagged with “#adulting.” These are meant to serve as examples that the younger generation is just a bunch of widdle babies. To do a pun bit from his rant better than he did: Apparently when Baby Boomer comedians get into their 60s, they are at an increased risk of irony deficiency. Maybe some people use that word/hashtag unironically, but the posts he showcased were obviously not sincere.

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Le Grand Voyage! (1)

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Original linkOriginal author: Sean Stephane Martin

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DEATH RAT No. 1 WETWERKX GRAFFIKX

© & ™ WETWERKX™. © THE KING OF SLOP™.

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Original linkOriginal author: THE KING OF SLOP™

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War of the Realms — Reading Order

War of the Realms #1 cover by Arthur AdamsA chronological reading order for Marvel’s War of the Realms event, including all the crossovers and tie-ins.

Marvel is kicking off their first major event centering around Jason Aaron’s Thor. He’s participated in several other Marvel events, but never had one of his own. It’s actually amazing that it has taken this long since Aaron’s run with the character is the longest one going at Marvel right now. While the event itself hasn’t started yet, there is plenty to read beforehand to get ready. The issues are listed by release date at the moment, but they will be updated weekly as the books come out.

The main book, along with any tie-ins that are critical to the main story are in bold. Tie-ins that are still worth reading and enhance the overall story are not bolded or italicized. And issues that contribute to the event, but are not critical to the main story (and can most likely be skipped) are in italics.

Background Reading

There is really only one bit of recommended reading, but it’s a big one: Jason Aaron’s whole run on Thor, starting with Thor: God of Thunder. Comic Book Herald has a great Thor reading order that can help with that. If 6+ years worth of comics is a little much, Marvel has conveniently thrown a few key issues into a collection called War of the Realms Prelude. The only addition I would add is Thor: God of Thunder #12, one of the best issues of the whole run, and really the first issue that sets things in motion for War of the Realms.

So without further ado…

Collections:PrologueThor Vol. 5 #10 | 2/13/2019Avengers Vol. 8 #16 | 3/13/2019Asgardians of the Galaxy #7 | 3/13/2019Thor Vol. 5 #11 | 3/20/2019Avengers Vol. 8 #17 | 3/20/2019Main EventWar of the Realms #1 | 4/3/2019War of the Realms: Journey Into Mystery #1 | 4/10/2019War of the Realms: War Scrolls #1 | 4/10/2019Asgardians of the Galaxy #8 | 4/10/2019The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #43 | 4/10/2019War of the Realms #2 | 4/17/2019Thor Vol. 5 #12 | 4/17/2019War of the Realms: Punisher #1 | 4/17/2019Avengers Vol. 8 #18 | 4/24/2019War of the Realms: Uncanny X-Men #1 | 4/24/2019Venom #13 | 4/24/2019Original linkOriginal author: Justin Beeson

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“Don’t Die, I Love You!”

https://tailsfromthebackyard.com/2019/01/25/dont-die-i-love-you/

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Original linkOriginal author: Lynda the Monkey

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The Watchmen (film review)

The comedian, Silk Spectre, Mr Manhattan, Ozymandias, Night Owl, Rorschach.

This year a TV show based on the watchmen comics would be debuting. In order to prepare myself or rather to know what I to look forward to, I saw the 2009 movie of the same name.

Watchmen, the movie, directed by Zach Synder is strangely over three hours. As DC films go, it’s the most violent, R rated piece of pretentious material they have ever made. The plot revolves primarily around Rorschach, a masked vigilante played by the very exceptional Jackie Earle Haley, who investigates the murder of the anti hero known as the comedian. He inadvertently uncovers a larger conspiracy; one that might just decide the delicate fate of world peace.

The movie as I earlier stated is over three hours; so there are lots of minor story arcs; Sally Jupiter and the comedian’s love - hate relationship, An awkward love triangle involving a glowing blue man who is really comfortable with being naked (I kid you not!) and of course doomsday — the pen - ultimate nuclear war between America and the Soviet Union.

The critics that saw the movie in 2009 either really, really loved it, or really, really hated it. As the end credits rolled in, I was at first indifferent, but slowly the hatred marinated till I could not ignore it anymore. The film is bad. It’s that simple.

In the beginning, there’s a still shot of a murdered lesbian vigilante and her lover. On the walls, written conveniently in blood is Lesbian whores, and in what’s the most daunting scene in the movie, the comedian savagely beats Sally Jupiter for daring to defend herself against his harassment and tries to rape her. And also very conveniently, another male vigilante comes to her rescue.

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The Horror of EC Comics

My experience with the genre of horror has been a long and twisted genre. Where I refuse to watch TV shows or movies marketed as thrillers or horror, I can binge watch crime shows like Criminal Minds or Bones for hours. Therefore, I have come to find that my aversion to horror is more an aversion to the genre that puts me on edge before I’ve even sat down to experience it. Interestingly, in choosing to read The Vault of Horror, a horror comic from the year 1950, I found myself more involved with the text than any other comic I’d read thus far.

As a modern reader, it feels like the first time I’ve seen a comic without propaganda from the time period. The focus, although in the genre of horror, is on telling a good story and creating an atmosphere through color and illustration rather than to put forward a political bias or commentary on society at the time. The comic seems both dated and timeless, like a campy classic that one continues returning to for the nostalgia and brilliant story.

The colors draw me in more than anything else, purples and greens for the different lighting shifting the mood panel to panel and shifting the focus in and out of intense horror and contextual exposition. It’s nothing I’d see in a comic book released today. The reason for this is as society shifts and changes the trends in art shift and change at the same time. Art that I see being produced nowadays, especially in the realm of animation and Comics is softer, simpler, choosing to create complexity through computer generated artwork. It is easy to tell when something was hand drawn versus digitally created. All methods are equally impressive but modernity can be traced through Comics as the characters features become less intense, less humanistic, more cartoon, softer, digitally rendered onto a page. I notice this more between covers and internal pages, most comic pages are still drawn but the covers are digital.

In The Vault of Horror, characters look slightly different panel to panel, the focus on realistic features makes it so on one panel, a character may be grimacing, changing their entire set of features and on the next they look slightly morphed. In modern comics, depending on the artist, this doesn’t happen as much, the techniques used are changing.

Although, I love this issue, I recognize that for a younger audience it would violate a certain societal code we have in place. This issue contains a disfigured creature feasting on its father. As a concept of horror, it’s incredible, as a comic book for children, the ideals it could instill have the possibility of being negative. I think society doesn’t give kids enough credit, however, to distinguish between reality and fiction.

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Sonnets About Eyebrows and the Importance of Mental Health

So here’s the thing… I read an EC comic book Psychoanalysis #1. And it was a doozy.

The first client this psychiatrist analyzes is Freddy Carter, which seems to be a tale of toxic masculinity and over-bearing parents. It takes both the reader and the psychiatrist about 4 seconds to realize that the parents are the true cause of Freddy’s issues. They never leave him alone, they treat him like “Dresden China,” sounds healthy, right? Then we get into the toxic masculinity coming from his father who says, “I’m a man and I want my son to be a man… Not some effeminate drip, writing sonnets about ladies’ eyebrows or soaking up poetic atmosphere in a daisy field…” Charming, isn’t he?

I would like to begin by saying 1) People should feel free to write sonnets about eyebrows, because sometimes they just look amazing and should be appreciated accordingly. 2) If I didn’t have allergies I would adore going to a daisy field to get inspired, that sounds like a lovely Sunday afternoon to me. Anyway, as for the father’s accusations, just reading these from a modern perspective made me roll my eyes continually. This comic represents a time when this was a common mindset for men, but even with that said, it can’t help but make someone angry that people genuinely believed the arts were “sissy” pursuits. It’s stories like this that we are fighting so hard to force into oblivion, because we know how harmful this mindset is and representing it just gives it a voice to wedge itself in people’s minds.

The second story in this comic revolves around Ellen Lyman. She is tormented by a dream and the psychiatrist analyzes it with her. I think this story is interesting, because it brings up how mental health can affect physical health, since Ellen suffers from migraines and sleeplessness. That could be extremely helpful for younger readers to learn about so that they know how interconnected their mind and body are. One must value mental health as much as physical health and if we can teach that to younger generations, it could help them tremendously as they go through life.

The final story is of Mark Stone, who seems to be suffering from anxiety and panic attacks. I also found this piece to be beneficial in a modern context as it deals with not only anxiety and panic attacks, but also the feeling of not succeeding or doing something meaningful in your chosen career path. Many people struggle with a form of anxiety or suffer from panic attacks, and honestly, it was refreshing to see a story where a man was suffering from those things, especially considering when this was written. At that time, if this had been a woman fainting and being anxious, some could have written it off as her just being a “fragile woman.” By focusing on a man suffering from these things, it gives it more of an urgency that I think people then would have paid more attention to. Plus, representation! It was needed just as much then as it is now.

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AI can accelerate the shift to a more sustainable future

Sustainability

circulareconomy

Related ArticlesThe journey toward a circular economy: From Muir Beach to data centersThe path to a sustainable future begins with informed decisionsLet the sunshine in: opening the market for more renewable energy in AsiaWhy we’re putting 1.6 million solar panels in Tennessee and AlabamaReimagining the Google supply chainThe Internet is 24x7. Carbon-free energy should be too.

Today’s industrial economy is hugely wasteful. In 2018, the global demand for resources was 1.7 times more than what the Earth can support in one year. As population size and consumption continues to grow, we need to make an unprecedented, economy-wide shift or the effect on the planet will be irreversible.

Instead of our current “take-make-waste” economy, we need to shift to a system where waste is dramatically reduced and growth is decoupled from the consumption of finite resources—a circular economy. This is much like what we see in nature: A tree grows from the energy of the sun and the nutrients in the soil, once it dies it turns into soil to fuel the growth of new life. In this model, everything from cars and refrigerators to packaging and clothing would be repurposed and reborn for use again.

However, upheaving our industrial economy built over centuries requires new approaches and technological might. According to research we published this week with Ellen MacArthur Foundation and McKinsey & Company, AI can not only accelerate the shift to a more sustainable future, but also generate new value.

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Anyone But Her

by Kendra Wells

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Original linkOriginal author: The Nib

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The Life of Gad Beck: Gay, Jewish, Nazi Fighter.

by Dorian Alexander and Levi Hastings

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Original linkOriginal author: The Nib

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