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Music Madness

“You can’t talk, can you?” sighed Copper as they headed towards the exit. Irons silence offered a reply.

Copper grabbed her Hi-Fi’s keyboard as she left the house. She’d heard voiceless robots would only communicate with keyboards synchronized to musical devices.

She immediately chastised herself. Clearly, that was stereotyping.

Thanks to Warren for the $10 Patronage.

Ko-Fi | Patreon | Etsy | Books | Skillshare | Threadless

Original linkOriginal author: Little Fears

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Gratis Captain Marvel [2019] Película Completos en español latino

➽ Capitana Marvel (2019) Gratis en HD✓Descargar Capitana Marvel (2019)

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Original linkOriginal author: Robert Garza

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Pelajaran Yang Kita Ambil Dari Karya Mangaka Death Note

Selamat setengah abad untuk illustrator favorit pertamaku, Takeshi Obata! Beliau adalah mangaka dari komik terkenal Death Note dan Bakuman。. Hikaru’s Go terkenal gak sih? Haha aku yakin yang seangkatanku kayanya pada tau samar-samar sih, soalnya dulu animenya tayang di TV7.

Tapi sebelumnya diriku mengenal beliau dari Hikaru’s Go (atau dikenal dengan Hikaru no Go). Saat itu diriku sekitar kelas 3 atau 4 SD (2003–2005), Hikaru’s Go volume 7 dengan Waya dan Hikaru di sampulnya bisa dibilang Manga pertamaku yang beli dengan uang sendiri haha. Death Note volume 1 terbit di Indonesia sekitar tahun 2007 atau 2008, saat itu diriku belinya di kantin sekolah, kantin 1 Yaspendhar, dan Death Note kubeli bukan karena,”Wah komik ngetop nih”, bukan. Death Note kubeli karena,”Wih Takeshi Obata baru nih!”. Yash, di artikel ini aku ingin berbagi pelajaran apa yang kudapatkan dari karya beliau.

Membahas ini pastinya kita harus ingat juga para partner Takeshi Obata yang beliau percaya untuk membuat story, mereka adalah Yumi Hotta (dan Yukari Umezawa) untuk Hikaru no Go, dan juga Tsugumi Ohba untuk Death Note dan Bakuman。. Tsueno Takano untuk Blue Dragon ga usah wkwkw. Ini dia pelajaran yang kudapatkan!

RIVAL ITU PERLU!

Rival itu menimbulkan keresahan, rival membuat kita akan bergerak untuk keluar dari zona nyaman haha. Seperti kata pak Novian Deni Nugraha di acara IMAGI dulu,”Di saat keresahana tak ada lagi, di situ kreativitas mati”.

PADA AKHIRNYA RIVAL MENJADI TEMAN!

Hahaha dan ini terjadi di aku hampir selalu. Mungkin juga terjadi ke kamu? Yang awalnya berkembang untuk melawan rival hingga akhirnya berkembang bersama rival. Seperti Hikaru yang bekerja sama di turnamen bersama Akira, Light yang bekerja sama (WALAUPUN KITA TAU YA SUPAYA APA HAHAHA) dengan L untuk menemukan Kira (dan mengembangkan potensi Kira untuk membunuh L!), dan Mashiro yang menjadi asisten Eiji. Wah, untuk Mashiro bekerja sama dengan Eiji aku rada lupa sih gimana-gimananya haha

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Smack in the Middle with You! (3)

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Original linkOriginal author: Sean Stephane Martin

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I Didn’t Say Favorite.

https://tailsfromthebackyard.com/2019/02/18/i-didnt-say-favorite/

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Original linkOriginal author: Lynda the Monkey

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CATHY QUEST: PAROVOZ STUDIO RELEASED AN ANIMATED SERIES FOR LITTLE QUESTIONERS

Where do muffins come from? Why do submarines always sinking? How to make forks and spoons from the mountain? And why do weathermen need traps? Each episode of the new educational series What’s Inside will answer these and many other questions that children like to ask so much.

CATHY AND ANYWAY DOOR

The format of the new series is a number of 5-minute episodes for viewers over 2 years. Each episode is a trip to find out how everything works and what professions exist.The characters of the series — a girl Katya and her imaginary friend Ef — travel through the anyway door to bakery, oceanarium, factory, behind the scenes of mall, and other places which are not so easy to see for an average adult if he is not related to those professions. One of the scheduled episodes of What’s Inside will be about the organisation of an animation studio.

PRE-SCHOOL ANIMATED SERIES OF PAROVOZ STUDIO

In our portfolio, we already have education series for the little ones such as Woodventures, Be-Be-Bears, Cutie Cubies, but What’s Inside is unique in its own way.

Imagine, that you make a serious science documentary… for children.That’s how What’s Inside series is made. We mix adventures and learning… and some jokes

— comments Ekaterina Kashintseva, the executive producer of the new series.

Original linkOriginal author: Animation studio Parovoz

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Comics by Annie

Annie was 8 years old when she first remembers reading comic books. It began when her dad saw her wanting to read the comic strips in every Sunday news paper. To avoid stunting her inquiring mind, and to enable her growing curiosity, and passion, her father picked her up her first comic book, Archie. Although she did not read all the ‘Archie’ comics she did say that “Archie opened me up to the world of comics, and from there, I just went crazy”. One of her favorite past times is reading ‘Casper the Friendly Ghost’ comics during her first memorable Halloweens. This was before of course, she was allowed to read the vault of horror comics.

Quickly, through high school her love for comics expanded. Annie delved into the superhero comics like crazy reading mostly Marvel and DC. Her favorite character was and still is Black Widow simply because “There is nothing super about her. She is just a regular lady who happens to be a badass!” . Annie continued to say that she tries to implement the Black Widow into her everyday life. “She is a strong role model for females everywhere. She proves that you don’t need powers to be super. I guess she just shows that the average woman is just as strong as the strongest man”. Annie let me in to her favorite scenes being when Black Widow is with Maki on the train trying to figure out who hired her. She leaves the encounter victorious while maniacally and silently using Maki’s own weapon against her while on a community train. She leaves stating “Killing is easy, but making people suffer is an art”. Right there Annie knew black widow was her favorite superhero. This is because “she’s not like the destructive, macho men. She’s not going to hulk smash. She did what she needed to do without disrupting the children on the train. She demolished the enemy without anyone even noticing it was happening. If that isn’t the definition of super, man I don’t know what is.”

the image above is from https://readcomiconline.to/Comic/Black-Widow-2010/Issue-4?id=9156 . Issue 4 of Marvel Black Widow

Annie has not given up comic books and doesn’t think she ever will. Being 25 years old now she only sees her love for comics growing through the rebirth of Wonder Woman, and the recent media publications of Black Panther and Spider Man. Overall, Annie states that “Once you enter the universe of comics, you’re screwed. There are to many universes to explore and you will get lost. However not returning is the best part.”

Original linkOriginal author: Emily Eckart

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PERCIBE LA GUERRA EN EL CINE

El paso de los cómics de superhéroes al cine era un proceso lento y sin éxito en el principio debido a la complicada naturaleza de los efectos visuales requeridas por el mismo cómic. Sin embargo, el pionero que implementó esta técnica era DC comics. Recientemente, ha habido una gran conmoción debido a los avances de ciertas películas estrenadas en 2018 . Algunos remolques han aumentado aún más las expectativas de los fanáticos. Por ejemplo: Deadpool 2, Avengers Infinity war, Ant-man y la avispa, Aquaman. L os tres primeros se basan en Marvel y el otro en DC Comics.

Las ideas anteriores han arrojado combustible al fuego del debate eterno entre los fanáticos de estas dos editoriales y las películas basadas en ellas. Constantemente los fanáticos preguntan quién es el mejor ¿ Marvel o DC? Toda esta industria no hubiera sido posible sin el primero de todos los superhéroes: Superman, creado por el escritor estadounidense Jerry Siegel y el dibujante canadiense Joe Shuster en 1932; El personaje fue comprado por Detective Comics (el futuro DC). Luego, la misma compañía publicó cómics como Batman, Wonder Woman y, más allá, el primer equipo de superhéroes: la Sociedad de Justicia estadounidense.

Alrededor de los años 60, DC comenzó a ser confrontado por una pequeña empresa en crecimiento: Marvel, que, con su universo de superhéroes y temas de vida cotidiana, aumentaron número de lectores. Los primeros caracteres, Timely Comics narran aventuras de Namor, hombre del Submarino Atlantis que tenía habilidades como mosca y respirar bajo el agua. La antorcha humana, un androide que podría cubrirse y controlar el fuego; y el único de estos tres que trascendió el período de posguerra: el Capitán América. La competencia de los jefes de la industria DC y Marvel generó necesidad de innovar y crear historias.

Películas basadas en el Universo DC que se consideran el único: La noche oscura; Podría decirse que es la mejor película para un villano. El Joker encarnado por el difunto Heath Ledger, cuya actuación fue única, vio como Burn the World era su propósito en la vida; qué mayor referencia a un Oscar y a muchos especialistas que están de acuerdo en que “ es el mejor Joker de la historia”. No podía faltar el desempeño impecable de Christian Bale como Batman, que se muestra de manera natural esa heroica imagen sombría del superhéroe, un dúo excepcional en el cine.

Entonces, ¿quién es mejor en el cine, ¿Marvel o DC? Para muchos es Marvel, porque toma el liderazgo en cantidad de producciones que se ajustan a un solo universo, lo que viene como un gran logro, varias películas son de muy buena calidad (no están exentas de fallas) y cuentan para una diversidad más diversa. audiencia. Por otro lado, es DC, quien recientemente se ha visto sombreado por el nuevo éxito de su competidor y también por el fracaso de sus últimas películas: Superman vs Batman, Justices league , Wonder woman, que fue la única que tuvo éxito.

Original linkOriginal author: CRIST YARITH QUIMBAYO MORALES

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Marvel’s attack on conservatives in comics has nothing to do with socialism, please stop repeating…

Marvel’s attack on conservatives in comics has nothing to do with socialism, please stop repeating this lie.

It’s not socialism if:

You work under a defined hierarchy.You are grossely underpayed.You don’t own the rights to the work.Calling out injustice in that field blacklists you from others in that field.

None of this is how socialism works.

Please actually fucking study what socialism is, and you’re being exactly the same kind of manipulative shits others in this industry are.

Original linkOriginal author: Psypher Sarah

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“National Emergency”

by Pia Guerra

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Original linkOriginal author: The Nib

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Marriage is a difficult thing for pairs

There is not one thing about this comic that is right. I am really at a loss as to why I would create such a thing. ©️andrew ulanoff 2019

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Original linkOriginal author: agency andy

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What’s Next?

Sometimes I think I don’t want to be anywhere

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Original linkOriginal author: Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell

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Interview with David Jablin, Editor & Publisher of Imagination Fanzine circa 1971

Ken Meyer Jr. • Ink Stains • December 2018

Q: When and how old were you when you got into comics in general?

I was three years old when I picked up my first comic book. It was at a local barber shop in Flushing, Queens while reluctantly waiting for a haircut. Stuffed between some issues of Archie and Highlights magazine, was a well-worn Superman comic — issue 113 to be exact. I can pinpoint this as the precise moment I was first transported to another universe. My mother read the cover aloud to me… “Superman: A 3-Part Novel!” Here was this colorful, caped character watching another strangely costumed man fighting a robot on this huge atomic TV. Superman’s word balloon read, “My father from Krypton was a Superman too! He had to protect a queen the way I do Lois Lane!” I got it. I couldn’t read it but I could somehow follow the whole story.

I was so entranced that I didn’t even notice I was getting my haircut. When finished the barber said I could keep it. WOW! My first comic book! Afterwards my mother took me right down the block to the corner candy store where I discovered that there were racks full of these amazing comic books stacked taller than I could reach… As I grew up, this particular candy store, named Dottie’s, would be my regular haunt for many years on the days when the new comics came in. Eventually I could even reach the top rack. And I wasn’t the only kid who grew up hanging around that corner waiting for the new comics to be delivered and unbundled. As a matter of fact, one of the other rabid comic fans was a young Howard Chaykin who lived just down the block.

There is no doubt that comics taught me to read. I used to ask my parents how to pronounce the words printed in bold and explain what they meant. Invulnerable, invincible and X-ray became part of my pre-school vocabulary. In fact, I remember very clearly how in kindergarten I got in trouble for secretly wearing my “official” Ben Cooper Superman Halloween costume shirt under my clothing. I left my top button open so just the top of the “S” could peek out. When any of the other kids curiously asked, “What are you wearing under your shirt?” I would quickly button up as if I was hiding something and said “Oh, nothing…” The teacher did not find this at all funny and I was sent to the principal’s office where I actually tried to pull the same stunt on him! Needless to say, they called my mother to come in and I was lectured about my hyperactive imagination.

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Death, Death, and Friends

In graduate thesis paper, “Not Cruel, Blessed, or Merciful: Pratchett, Gaiman, and the Personification of Death,” Kiki V. Canon examines the ways both the personification of death in Neil Gaiman’s comic title The Sandman with the personification of death in Terry Pratchetts’ fantasy novel series Discworld subvert traditional western cultural views of death and analyzes what these personications and their respective gender-identifications suggest about how humans can relate to their own mortality and how these ideas made a cultrual impact.

Through what would best be defined as a qualitative cultural studies/semiotic analysis, though there are certainly strong elements of a literary study/autership, Canon comes to the conclusion that both works express the notion that the inevitability of death for humans should be accepted calmly rather than feared or evaded and that this notion fostered more open discussions of death, influenced popular views, and representations other works of literature.

Though this paper is only partially about a comic, the in-depth detailed analysis of The Sandman, the thoughtful references to other works of comic scholarship, and the fact that it compares the ideas expressed in a comic directly with those in a novel makes it an extremely interesting and valuable piece of comic-scholarlship. Significantly, Canon even discussed the ways that a comic form gave Gaiman an advantage in the expression of his ideas.

Though Discworld is a children’s comic fantasy series, and therefore not considered “high culture,” the ability to compare a more traditional novel to a comic is still an important step in accepting that comics are an equally important medium of expressing ideas and telling stories. It also emphasized that “low culture” works can convey massively important messages about the human experience.

In terms of the study of The Sandman, Canon utilizes the corpus of the entire The Sandman title, but also specifically draws on certain pages and issues for detailed analysis. They examines both her general characterization and the significance of her identification/presentation as a woman.

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Advertising in Comics through an Economic Lense

The October 2018 article “The Economics of the Modern American Comic Book Market” by Jerry Hionis and YoungHa Ki in the Journal of Cultural Economics looks into the economics surrounding the production of comic books and how the market has changed over time. Part of the article’s analysis focuses on advertising in comics — what proportion of the pages in issues contain advertisements, and what the content of those ads is.

In their investigation into advertising within comics, Hionis and Ki conducted a survey of 355 individual comic books released in 2016, from both Marvel and DC. They found that 30–40% of space within the average comic is ad space, and asserted that this space is a vital source of revenue for publishers. Hionis and Ki also found that comics which included a smaller proportion of ads overall, such as Marvel and Image Comics, cost more than average.

For my own investigations I am interested in delving into the content of advertising within comics — what products are being advertised and what they use for appeal. This articles analysis does a sort of this content analysis, though it’s “other” category is more broad than my own will be. Hionis and Ki found that most of the content advertised within comic books was self referential to the publisher, whether to other comics, or to related media such as movies and TV shows. The frequency of ads for media from the same publisher makes sense on multiple levels. By using its own ad space the publisher has a convenient way to promote new products. Additionally, a current comic reader is likely to also enjoy either other comics or comic inspired media. By introducing current audiences to new content, comic publishers can sell a larger amount of content to the same audience.

The ads for products unrelated to comics also provide interesting insights. Though within this analysis these products are mostly lumped into the “other” category, as the authors point out, these items provide important insights into how publishers and advertisers perceive their audiences. As mentioned in an earlier section of the article, there have been no recent reliable studies into the demographics of comic book audiences. However, one way to gain some insight into comic audiences is to examine the types of products being advertised in comic books. The popularity of ads for things like cars, shaving kits, and credit cards implies that audiences are in large percentages adult men. The nature of these advertisements reveals who advertisers think readers are. Hionis and Ki assert that “One could postulate that true diversity in readership will be identified once the advertising reflects it,” a position I agree with and look forward examining more in depth.

Overall this article provides a very good overview of the economics of the comic book industry as a whole, and provides some important details concerning advertising within comics, and what its content reveals about both advertisers and their audiences.

Original linkOriginal author: Allison Blaine

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A Week in Writing #234

For a little change of pace, I thought I’d better describe the week as it goes along.

On Monday night, Paul and I reviewed new pencils from Rachel. She sent us pages 9 through 16 on Sunday night but we didn’t have a chance to look at it until the next night. We liked what she sent and didn’t have any comments or suggestions. She should be sending us more pages this month.

Also worked on the next week’s A Week in Powers Squared thumbnail. Found an image from Issue #4 which we will be discussing. I had already done some editing on the image and was able to do some color matching for the background. I’ll admit I have no flair for the lettering but I was happy with the overall look. Usually, the lettering covers up something in the image or looks wedged in but this one has the image to one side and the lettering on the other.

Finished my review of Making a Living for Trophy Unlocked, adding about 355 words to the review, adding images and posting it on the blog.

Also did some more work on The Runaway.

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The Birth Of Vinegaroon

Vinegaroon | Biten by a radioactive whip scorpion near a nuclear reactor, a young man has been endowed with the powers of super strength and night vision.

Having lost his parents in an explosion at the now closed site, he moves to Los Angeles to start over.

He rents an apartment near Hollywood Blvd and Highland Ave.

Financially independent from his parent’s inheritance, inspired by the comic book characters that inhabit the famous theater near where he lives, he gives birth to Vinegaroon.

A real superhero in a land of imaginary ones.

Moral certainty in an uncertain age.

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Whose side are you on?

A deeper look into the Marvel Civil War Comic Event.

In my studies to discover why the Marvel Civil War comics series matters, I found an excellent peer-reviewed article by Michael J. Prince titled, ‘Whose side are you on?’: negotiations between individual liberty and collective responsibility in Millar and McNiven’s Marvel Civil War. The author takes a look at how the battles in the comic are an allegory for the political conflicts of the United States after the initiation of the Patriot Act.

What I loved about this article was how the author looked at both sides of the conflict and explained how they differ ideologically. On one side we have Captain America, who is not a conservative or liberal, but the American ideal. He represents what America could and should strive to be.

“Captain America’s initial skepticism to the registration act is not so much limiting his own freedom, as forsaking the right to decide, for himself, when, where and to whom his violence shall be focused. In a word, the Superhuman Registration Act strips the individuals of their own individual moral determinations, transforming them into obedient civil servants under a government bureaucracy such as the real-world Homeland Security” (Prince, 2014).

On the opposite side of the conflict we have Tony Stark, a market-savvy media mogul and one-time purveyor of weapons systems to the government, fights in favor of government control, but out of a sense of collective responsibility. He felt guilty after the super-human caused catastrophic explosion killed hundreds of innocent children and thought that supers needed to be put in check.

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One day I’ll open a spa

a truly tranquil one

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Original linkOriginal author: Kimmy Tao

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Approaching Religion in Comics as a Scholarly Matter

Unsurprisingly, trying to find scholarly articles for comics is a difficult task to accomplish. Finding good articles talking about both comics and religion is even harder to come by, especially with having to analyze each article to see if it actually matches the search criteria.

Fortunately I was able to find a small sampling of such articles in Graven Images: Religion in Comics and Graphic Novels; a compilation of scholarly articles all centered upon how religion is presented in comics. The only downside to finding such a resources was the fact that in order to read the collection you either had to find/buy a print copy of the book or purchase the Amazon Kindle version for $30, I went with the $30 in this scenario.

The particular article I was most interested in, and the ultimate deciding factor in purchasing the Kindle access, was Comics and Religion: Theoretical Connections by Darby Orcutt at North Carolina State University. Orcutt’s main goals of the piece being how the presentation of religious themes/ideas should be viewed by the audience in a critical fashion, as well as how comics are able to present such ideology in a way that connects with the audience.

Excerpt from Scott McCloud’s Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art

Orcutt is able to easily identify such methods of presentation and persuasion in focusing on the works of the Jack Chick, James Strum, and Deepak Chopra via Virgin Comics. The examination of each of these presented authors and their works is done so with the help of author Scott McCloud and his infamous piece Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art. Orcutt specifically uses McCloud’s work on identification and visual design in relation to how the audience will perceive the piece in comparison to themselves.

Example of a Chick tract by Jack Chick

Out of the three, both Jack Chick and James Strum heavily use this method on their readers. Chick known for his “Chick tracts,” Christian based gospel comics that relied on audience character identification to engage the reader in the piece. Chick used simply designed characters and basic modern stories of the time, which took drastic turns between normal and dark, to connect with the readers, in addition to promote different facets of evangelist fundamentalist based Christianity.

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