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Hourly Comic Day 2018 & 2019

Comics from February 1st '18 & ‘19.

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Original linkOriginal author: Sam Neukirch

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I love the way you express yourself with more than words.

I love the way you express yourself with more than words. This grabbed my attention because of your illustrations. It’s a great way to get your message across. It’s obvious you have a gift for communicating.

Original linkOriginal author: Barbara Radisavljevic

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School Comics 2008–2012

When I was a teenager, comics were my dream job. During college, I developed crippling anxiety that stifled my confidence in doing them.

Please enjoy scans of my early comic attempts — apologies for how small the files are, but you know, it was back when I used Livejournal normally haha.

Original linkOriginal author: Sam Neukirch

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Hourly Comic Day 2013 & 2014

Hourly Comics from when I was at FIT.

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Original linkOriginal author: Sam Neukirch

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Little Mice

A comic for Invisible Illness: Anxiety about why I started meds.

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Original linkOriginal author: Sam Neukirch

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10 Things That Scare Me

Photo by Melanie Wasser on UnsplashForgetting to lock the doorBeing caught in a natural disasterAll my teeth falling out unexpectedly

(I can’t be the only one.)

The darkSuperbugsDrivingReplying to a text a message that I’d left unanswered for too longBig moves to new cities where I know no onePublic speaking (when not telling jokes)Running out of ideas

That’s a (short) list of my own fears. I challenge Stephen M. Tomic Ellie Daforge Mark Starlin Michelle Monetand Lindsay Linegar to make their own lists (illustrations not required)

Original linkOriginal author: Kyrie Gray

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Flying is more cramped than when I go shopping at Trader Joe’s and have only one bag.

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Original linkOriginal author: agency andy

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With Founder Gym, a new approach to supporting tech entrepreneurs

As a public school teacher and a leader of education nonprofits, Shani Dowell saw an opportunity to better communicate parents’ feedback to their kids’ schools. The parents shared ideas, praise and frustrations with one another, yet there was no system in place to give more routine feedback to school administration. So Shani created Possip, a platform for parents to give weekly feedback in less than a minute. It gives the schools actionable reports and helps them see trends, while allowing parents to track their school's progress and responses to feedback.

Shani didn't have all the resources and connections to grow her budding tech company, so she joined a six-week, online training program called Founder Gym. Over the course of the program, Shani and founders from around the world received training from seasoned founders and investors from firms like Y Combinator and Backstage Capital. The program helped Shani improve her company—schools using Possip now get more parent feedback in a month than they previously received in a full year, and 100 percent of Possip's first schools outperformed their district in achievement or growth.

To bring a diversity of perspectives to the startup community and empower more founders like Shani, we’re becoming a founding partner of Founder Gym. We’ll provide scholarships for people to attend the Founder Gym training program, which addresses the challenges that underrepresented founders face, like access to networks and funding.

Big ideas can come from anywhere, but the resources needed to succeed are not evenly distributed. We proudly took an early bet on Founder Gym to help them achieve their mission of developing the next generation of great leaders. And in the words of Mandela SH Dixon, CEO of Founder Gym, “As any founder knows, you never forget the first people to say ‘yes’ to your dream.”

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The workforce awaits

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Original linkOriginal author: agency andy

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This is not a New Yorker comic

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Original linkOriginal author: agency andy

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The Greenback New Deal

by Matt Bors

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Original linkOriginal author: The Nib

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The Kids Are Alright.

From Nomi Kane.

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Original linkOriginal author: The Nib

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When Your Valentine Has the Flu

by Gemma Correll

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Original linkOriginal author: The Nib

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The Climb (yeah I like Miley Cyrus What!!)

The past two weeks have definitely put a damper on my ascension to an A in thermodynamics! The week before last I was plagued with a nasty flu that left me behind in work at my job, errands I needed to take care of, and most critical of all, homework assigned for the week. Granted, I wasn’t able to start it until Friday evening, at which point I threw in the towel after the blog. The week after, I was scheduled to go on a skiing vacation from Wednesday to Sunday. Still recovering from my illness I was unable to get any of the school work done before I left for the trip on Wednesday. The trip was an action packed nonstop routine of skiing promptly followed by drinking alcohol by the fire and eating a hearty dinner (I know poor me). Anyway that resulted in no homework submitted as well as no blog :( . Then I found out I scored a measly 79% on my first quiz. Oh the humanity! All I can say is I’m gonna strap down and F!#@ $!^& up! Get some! “You said you’re a fireman right?” “Yes, that is correct.” “Do you have two jobs, because my dad says you’re also a butt pirate”

Original linkOriginal author: Dynamo Joe

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Through Whose Eyes

[This comic was funded through Patreon under the ZEAL project. ZEAL aims to provide high quality criticism of rarely discussed games and comics, and showcase the talents of exciting new writers and artists. For details and information on how to donate, please check out our Patreon]

Original linkOriginal author: Ashanti Fortson

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These three Googlers would like to thank the Academy

Chances are, you’ve seen the work of Paul Debevec, Xueming Yu and Wan-Chun Alex Ma on the big screen—but you probably don’t know it. And that’s by design. Just this weekend, these Googlers took home an Academy Award for their face-digitizing technology, which has changed the way movies and video games use visual effects. And their goal is often to make sure you can just enjoy the characters, without thinking of them as computer-generated effects at all.

The three, alongside their former colleague Timothy Hawkins, won Scientific and Technical Achievement Awards for their work at the Institute for Creative Technologies at the University of Southern California, where they worked before heading to Google in 2016. (Debevec remains an adjunct professor there.) Along with a larger team, they created the Light Stage and its accompanying software, which capture 3D models of an actor’s face to be used for visual effects.

Actress Zoe Saldana is scanned in 2006 in Light Stage 5 at the USC Institute for Creative Technologies for her character Neytiri  in "Avatar"

Here’s how it works, in a nutshell: An actor performs scenes inside a dome, which features thousands of lights that hit his or her face at different angles. Multiple cameras capture different poses, and software converts the footage into a 3D model. Visual effects artists can use that model to create characters that can look like anything, from fantastical characters to realistic recreations.

The 3D model the team scanned of Stephen Lang's face for his photoreal digital stunt double as Col. Miles Quaritch in "Avatar"

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Dynamic audiences in Google Analytics for Firebase

For businesses to make the best decisions about where to invest their marketing budget, it’s critical that they understand user behavior on both their web and app properties. And while a website is often the first customer touchpoint, for many businesses, apps are where customers are spending more of their time. As a result, marketers need to capture audience insights from their app analytics that they can then take action on, both within and outside of their apps.

Google Analytics for Firebase, our app analytics solution, has historically given you the ability to organize your audiences around events, device type, and other dimensions. These criteria were not exhaustive, however, or dynamic as user behavior changed over time.

That’s why we’ve made enhancements to the audience builder experience, with a few major updates to help you identify relevant app audiences more easily and with greater precision:

Dynamic audience evaluation: Audiences are now dynamic by default, meaning Analytics will automatically include users as soon as they meet your criteria, and automatically exclude users when they no longer do. This allows you to “set and forget” your audiences while they populate, without the hassle of constantly re-evaluating them.Audience exclusion: Audiences can be more precisely defined by adding exclusion criteria. For example, you can create a list of users that added an item to a shopping cart and of those users, exclude those who have also made a purchase.Membership duration: Audiences can now include a membership time frame, such as “users that have converted in the last 30 days,” so your audiences and messaging remain fresh and timely.  

These new tools make audiences more powerful, flexible and actionable than before, so you can be confident that your insights reflect relevant users and activity on your apps. In 2019, we will continue to enhance the Google Analytics for Firebase audience builder, offering even more ways to precisely create audiences.

Take action once you’ve identified relevant audiences

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Celebrating community leaders bridging the digital divide

Local leaders know their communities best, and this Black History Month we’re celebrating organizations across the country that help people gain new skills, find jobs and grow their businesses. Over the past year, through our Grow with Google initiative, we've worked with leaders and organizations in Black communities across the US who are helping to close the digital skills divide.

One of these standout organizations with deep community roots is the Olivet Institutional Baptist Church in Cleveland, Ohio. In the 1960s, the church worked tirelessly with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to expand voter registration, paving the way for Carl Stokes to become the first Black mayor of a major U.S. city. Today, under the leadership of Reverend Dr. Jawanza Colvin, community activism and social justice remain at the heart of Olivet Church and its associated Olivet Housing & Community Development Corporation (OHCDC).

Cleveland has the second highest poverty rate among big cities in the U.S., so pathways to jobs is one of Rev. Colvin’s top priorities. Some members of his community and congregation are struggling to get access to good jobs and oftentimes don’t have the training required to change careers. To connect residents with the resources they need to compete for emerging information technology jobs in Cleveland, Rev. Colvin and OHCDC teamed up with Grow with Google to offer the IT Support Professional Certificate Program—an online curriculum designed to prepare people for roles in IT support. By creating cohorts of learners who are going through the IT Certificate curriculum together,  Reverend Colvin and the OHCDC are helping members of the Cleveland community prepare for jobs in a growing industry.

OHCDC is among many organizations who are helping their communities learn new digital skills to grow their careers and businesses. In Indianapolis, Larry Williams, President of the Indy Black Chamber of Commerce, is leveraging our tools and resources to teach local small businesses how to grow online. His first workshop was so popular that he’s continued to offer workshops to more than 100 business owners who are growing and creating more local economic opportunity. And in Columbia, South Carolina, JT McLawhorn—who leads the Columbia Urban League—used the Applied Digital Skills curriculum at their annual STEM careers summit, helping 400 teens in foster care prepare for summer jobs. The Columbia Urban League is now expanding these offerings across the state.

This year we launched the Grow with Google Partner Program to make sure that more community heroes like Reverend Colvin, Larry Williams and JT McLawhorn have access to free digital skill resources that help their communities thrive. We invite local heroes and organizations to learn more and apply at grow.google/partners. We look forward to continuing to support and celebrate the important work you’re leading in your communities.

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What is a support group without chairs?

Been working on myself though a new series of single panel gag comics.

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Original linkOriginal author: agency andy

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How to spend Valentines Day for men…alone.

After years of the Valentines Day stress each year, I find myself without the responsibility. I can enjoy it from afar, and just buy myself some heart shaped Whitman’s chocolates or even get a prix fix meal at a fancy restaurant. I might even surprise myself with a gold chain or something I might like.

all this junk ©️andy ulanoff 2019Original linkOriginal author: agency andy

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